Indoor vs. Outdoor Pool Costs

If you are considering indoor vs. outdoor pool costs, then this article is for you. Having your pool inside or outside comes with its own cost advantages and disadvantages which we’ll layout here for you. Armed with the information in this article, you should be able to make a more informed choice on which pool is right for your budget.

Indoor pool costs

On the whole, an indoor pool is more expensive due to the fact that you will have to house the pool in a room in your house or have an extension or outbuilding constructed. You will have to consult with the company that is building your pool and/or a building contractor to get a quote on how much this will actually cost you. You should also check that your property is not subject to planning restrictions, e.g. due to being on National Trust land or other restricted areas.

After the building has been sorted, then the pool will be installed. You will then have to choose what length pool you require and how it will be constructed. Will you opt for a cost effective liner pool or a tiled pool? Do you require the tiling to be in a specific pattern?

The final cost that should be considered for an indoor pool is heating. Both the water and the air in an indoor swimming pool needs to be heated. The interior of the building may be damaged if the humidity and air temperature is not controlled. An air handling unit is often used for indoor pools, which heat the water while controlling the humidity and air temperature.

Outdoor pool costs

The cost of an outdoor pool is considerably lower than that of an indoor pool. It can be built in your garden and does not need any buildings to go with it. The actual cost will vary depending on the construction methods used, from in-ground liner kits to high-end carbon ceramic custom-made pools. You may also want the pool a specific size and shape which will require more work and cost more to produce. Extras such as diving boards or water fountains will also drive costs upwards.

On top of this you may also want to have a cover fitted to keep out the elements when not used and ensure children are not in danger. Expect to pay at least £500 for one and over £10,000 for the high-end models.

Running costs

Don’t forget that both types of pool will have heating costs, especially indoor pools as well as the cost of chlorine and other chemicals to keep the pool water clean. The pump and sand filter will also need to be regularly serviced.

In conclusion, the indoor pool is far more expensive. However it can be used all year round and is not subject to environmental wear and tear. Therefore you may feel the extra cost is justified.